allthecanadianpolitics:

Program that helped special needs children on reserves loses funding

A Regina-based program that helped special needs children has lost funding from the federal government to provide services to families living on reserves.
The Early Childhood Intervention Program, which helps developmentally-delayed children in their early years, used funding from Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada to train workers and travel to reserves. Funding, which was used to help about 150 youngsters on reserves, amounted to $800,000 and ended in June. The non-profit which runs the program will continue to offer services, but only to Regina clients.
The visits made a huge difference to the McCallum family from the Pasqua First Nation, 60 kilometres northeast of Regina.
Three-year-old Dannalee McCallum has a form of spina bifida and doctors told her parents it was unlikely the youngster would be able to speak or walk.
But the child has made huge gains, credited to the Early Childhood Intervention Program, or ECIP.
"The doctors always told us they didn’t know where her paralysis was in her legs," the girl’s mother Danna Henderson-McCallum, told CBC News. "So the ECIP workers would work on exercises to get her from sitting to crawling to standing. And now she walks along furniture."
CBC News contacted officials in Ottawa to learn more about the funding cut to ECIP, but no comment was provided. An official only noted that the federal government is committed to helping aboriginal children.     
The McCallum family, however, does not feel that is happening.
"I want to be that voice for my daughter — for people who cannot speak — that our children deserve a chance," Henderson-McCallum said. "I feel like we’re not getting a chance."    
She added that paying for the program, from the family’s own resources, is not an option because they cannot use the Regina service even if they drove into the city. Nor is there a program available on reserve.
Todd Peigan, chief of the Pasqua First Nation, told CBC News that he attempted to get information from officials in Regina about the program’s funding cut and a possible alternative. He is still waiting for a response.
"It’s unfortunate that the department of Indian Affairs initiates programs, starts helping children and then cuts the program," Peigan said.

allthecanadianpolitics:

Program that helped special needs children on reserves loses funding

A Regina-based program that helped special needs children has lost funding from the federal government to provide services to families living on reserves.

The Early Childhood Intervention Program, which helps developmentally-delayed children in their early years, used funding from Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada to train workers and travel to reserves. Funding, which was used to help about 150 youngsters on reserves, amounted to $800,000 and ended in June. The non-profit which runs the program will continue to offer services, but only to Regina clients.

The visits made a huge difference to the McCallum family from the Pasqua First Nation, 60 kilometres northeast of Regina.

Three-year-old Dannalee McCallum has a form of spina bifida and doctors told her parents it was unlikely the youngster would be able to speak or walk.

But the child has made huge gains, credited to the Early Childhood Intervention Program, or ECIP.

"The doctors always told us they didn’t know where her paralysis was in her legs," the girl’s mother Danna Henderson-McCallum, told CBC News. "So the ECIP workers would work on exercises to get her from sitting to crawling to standing. And now she walks along furniture."

CBC News contacted officials in Ottawa to learn more about the funding cut to ECIP, but no comment was provided. An official only noted that the federal government is committed to helping aboriginal children.     

The McCallum family, however, does not feel that is happening.

"I want to be that voice for my daughter — for people who cannot speak — that our children deserve a chance," Henderson-McCallum said. "I feel like we’re not getting a chance."    

She added that paying for the program, from the family’s own resources, is not an option because they cannot use the Regina service even if they drove into the city. Nor is there a program available on reserve.

Todd Peigan, chief of the Pasqua First Nation, told CBC News that he attempted to get information from officials in Regina about the program’s funding cut and a possible alternative. He is still waiting for a response.

"It’s unfortunate that the department of Indian Affairs initiates programs, starts helping children and then cuts the program," Peigan said.

(via baapi-makwa)

you ever read a book so good you have to put it down like every half-page to reevaluate life?

(via jeankd)

things you may have forgotten because of the movies/fanon

oparnoshoshoi:

comealongraggedypond:

  • luna lovegood has dirty blonde hair (book 5, chapter 10)
  • lily potter has dark red hair (book 1, chapter 12)
  • neville longbottom has blond hair (JKR interview)
  • hermione granger has bushy hair (book 1, chapter 6)
  • james potter is tall (book 1, chapter 12)
  • at seventeen, harry potter is the same height as his father so he is also tall (book 7, chapter 34)
  • peter pettigrew is fat (book 3, chapter 10)
  • severus snape has yellow-ish teeth (book 3, chapter 14)
  • ginny weasley is fucking awesome (books 1-7)

That last one is extra important. Can I get a “Hallelujah!” from the congregation?

Reblog if you want a bunch of “have you evers” and “would you rathers” in your ask box right now.

(via jeankd)


New Mural Underway in Lac du Flambeau
Kids in Lac du Flambeau are working on a mural project this summer. The public art will be displayed on the side of the George W. Brown Ojibwe Cultural Museum.
About twenty five kids have spent the past month helping out on the mural project, which won a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. 
Greg Johnson is one of the project leaders.  He says he worked with the kids to design the mural. 
“And they’re gonna depict various plants and medicines from our Lac du Flambeau reservation, as well as some of the beadwork that’s found in the museum,” explained Johnson.  ”Me and the students we walked in there and checked out the old beadwork and quillwork, and decided that we’d pick some of those.”
continue reading

New Mural Underway in Lac du Flambeau

Kids in Lac du Flambeau are working on a mural project this summer. The public art will be displayed on the side of the George W. Brown Ojibwe Cultural Museum.

About twenty five kids have spent the past month helping out on the mural project, which won a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. 

Greg Johnson is one of the project leaders.  He says he worked with the kids to design the mural. 

“And they’re gonna depict various plants and medicines from our Lac du Flambeau reservation, as well as some of the beadwork that’s found in the museum,” explained Johnson.  ”Me and the students we walked in there and checked out the old beadwork and quillwork, and decided that we’d pick some of those.”

continue reading

misscherrylikesitdirty:

I think I might have broken my finger reblogging this. 

(via sugarpenchant)

Dissecting a character to fit a heteronormative box is sloppy and irresponsible. Bisexuals deserve to be represented in media too — not erased or straight-washed. If NBC can’t handle portraying a bisexual male character, then perhaps the network shouldn’t take on John Constantine.

Sexuality is always a part of a character — however minimal — but some sort of romantic or sexual relationship is usually a significant plot point in superhero stories. A bisexual male superhero would disrupt the hetero male template of, “hero saves damsel in distress” that we see consistently in iconic stories like Superman, Spiderman, and Captain America. But it’s 2014, and sometimes men need saving too.

There’s something particularly elusive about bisexual male characters. There is a deeply ingrained misconception that a man can’t be romantically involved with another man and still be interested in women as well. It’s centered on the idea that masculinity requires a wanting, and “getting” of women, and not men. But the depiction of Constantine in Hellblazer proves that is a false assumption.

NBC’s Straight-Washing of John Constantine is Bi Erasure | Eliel Cruz for the Advocate Magazine (via gaywrites)

It’s bad enough networks don’t create bisexual characters let alone when they "straightwash" an existing one from (30 years!) canon. Make your voice heard!

  1. Sign the Petition then signal boost it to your friends on Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, and anything else you can think of
  2. Tweet using the hashtag #BiBlazer (A combination of Bisexual and Hellblazer) to stop the bi erasure of a canon bisexual character. Direct your tweets to @JohnConWriters and @NBCConstantine.

(via bisexual-community)

(via bisexual-community)

  • *post about black women that only pertains to black women was made for black women by black women*
  • white girls: but what about white girls
  • translation: why are we talking about black women like they're people